Vendor Agreement for Services

When work is performed or services are provided by an outside party, it is often done under a vendor services agreement.

Business owners and individuals in need of services from a third party— whether as a one-time thing or on an ongoing basis — should use a vendor services agreement.

With a clear and professionally drafted vendor services agreement in place, your company can dramatically reduce the risk of conflict or confusion.

In this article, our top-rated Orlando, FL contract lawyers explain the most important things that you need to include in your vendor agreement for services.

The Key Provisions in a Vendor Services Agreement

There is tremendous value to having a properly crafted vendor services agreement. Similar to other commercial contracts, a vendor services agreement will control much of the relationship between a company and its outside contractor(s).

Not only will a clear and well-constructed vendor services agreement reduce the risk of a dispute, but it will also protect the legal rights and financial interests of your company. A good vendor services agreement should be comprehensive — it should address a wide range of different issues. Some of the key provisions that should be included within a vendor agreement for services include:

  • A Description of Services: First and foremost, a vendor services agreement should provide a clear overview of the nature and scope of the services that are to be offered under the contract. In some cases, a statement of work will be included with the agreement. The more detailed description of the services is, the better — as it is crucial that all parties understand their duties.
  • The Terms for Payment: Certainly, an effective vendor services agreement should have a clear explanation of the terms for payment. Among other things, the contract should address how much will be paid, when it will be paid, and how it will be paid. Often, the vendor is paid partially upfront and partially upon completion of the agreement.
  • Term of the Agreement: How long will the vendor services agreement last? Make sure that you clearly define the term of the relationship. Whether your company is hiring a vendor for a single event or to provide ongoing services, it is essential that the term of the contract is understood by all parties.
  • Limitation of Liability: Many vendor services agreements contain a limited liability clause or an indemnification clause. If you are entering into a vendor services agreement in Central Florida, be sure to carefully review the liability provisions. A lawyer can help you understand if the limitations on liability are fair, reasonable, and in your best interests. 
  • Restrictive Covenants: Depending on the nature of your relationship with the vendor, you may be interested in seeking a restrictive covenant. A common example of this is a non-compete agreement. For a number of different reasons, you may not want to work with a vendor that provides similar services to direct competitors. Notably, under Florida law (Florida Statutes § 542.335), there are very strict regulations regarding restrictive covenants. In order to be legally enforceable, non-compete agreements must be carefully drafted. 
  • Confidentiality Clause: A confidentiality clause is a contract provision that requires parties to refrain from disclosing certain information. Often, vendors receive access to some sensitive internal information. With a non-disclosure provision, parties may be able to make sure that key information is kept strictly confidential.
  • Renewal/Termination Clause: Finally, it is generally recommended that parties address issues of renewal and termination when negotiating a vendor services agreement. If the commercial relationship works well, parties may want an opportunity to ensure that they can keep moving forward with similar contract terms. Of course, there is always the possibility that, for whatever reason, a business relationship with a vendor may simply not work out. To prepare for this scenario, companies want to consider including some type of early termination option within the vendor services agreement.

Every commercial agreement is unique. Businesses should reach a vendor services agreement that suits their specific needs. Some provisions may simply not be relevant to your company. For example, your company may have little to no interest in bargaining for a non-compete clause. On the other hand, there are undoubtedly certain issues that will be extremely important to your business.

By working with an experienced Orlando, FL contract lawyer, you can be sure that your vendor services agreement will be right for the needs of your company.

Get Help From Our Orlando, FL Contract Attorneys Today

At BrewerLong, our Florida contract law attorneys have the skills and experience to assist clients with the full range of issues related to vendor service agreements. We work tirelessly to protect the legal rights and commercial interests of our clients. If you or your company needs help negotiating, drafting, reviewing, or litigating a vendor services agreement, we are here to help. 

To set up a free, strictly confidential introductory phone call, please do not hesitate to contact our law firm today. With an office in Maitland, we represent companies throughout Central Florida, including in Orlando, Sanford, Deltona, Apopka, Winter Park, and Lake Buena Vista.

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Trevor Brewer

Primarily working with business owners and their families, Trevor advises clients on business structuring and sale transactions, regulatory compliance, third-party contracts, liability protection and general matters facing small business owners. His focus extends beyond legal advice and includes business strategy and wealth preservation. Trevor also works with families regarding their estate planning needs, including probate, trust administration, and wills.

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